"Every child deserves a Black teacher"

Micia Mosely, Ph.D.
Micia Mosely Founder, Executive Director

Micia Mosely, Ph.D., has dedicated her career to helping students reach their full creative and academic potential. A teacher, analyst and product of public education, she designs custom reform strategies that help educators and administrators increase equity while maximizing school performance. Mosely brings a wealth of classroom experience to her work, infusing bold strategies with real-world approaches that understand the burdens faced by educators and administrators.

She is an expert on leadership, cultural competence, data-based inquiry and school design. Mosely began her career as the Social Studies department head at Thurgood Marshall Academic High School in San Francisco, CA and received her Ph.D. in Education, with an emphasis on Social and Cultural Studies from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Micia Mosely, Ph.D.
K. Wayne Yang, Research & University Collaborations Consultant

Dr. Yang's work transgresses the line between scholarship and community, as evidenced by his involvement in urban education and community organizing. He was the co-founder of the Avenues Project, a non-profit youth development organization, and also the co-founder of East Oakland Community High School. He also worked in school system reform as part of Oakland Unified School District's Office of School Reform. An accomplished educator, Dr. Yang has taught high school in Oakland, California for over 15 years and received the Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award in 2010.

His research focuses on the role of youth popular culture and pedagogy in the emergence of social movements. He is currently writing a book,√ā¬†Organizing the Common Sense: Popular Culture and Urban School Reform, which examines strategies for organizing in education across three landscapes: youth, community, and bureaucracy.

*Sometimes he writes as la paperson, an avatar that irregularly calls, as in the article, "The postcolonial ghetto: Seeing her shape and his hand" (Berkeley Review of Education).

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Micia Mosely, Ph.D.
Matthew Florence, Organization & Development Consultant

Matthew, a Southern native, has been working in the nonprofit industry since the 90's and brings a wealth of experience. He's worked in the areas of HIV/AIDS, LGBT community, Black and Latino community and health, and technology for nonprofits as a program director, executive director, and consultant.

Matthew credits Mrs. Horton, his seventh grade and first Black Teacher, with pushing him to excel in school. She also helped him to believe that math was something he could do and enjoy. Matthew pursued this love through high school where he was so excited he finished his entire geometry book in six weeks. However, his freshman calculus class at Harvard kicked his butt and sent him running toward literature, his other passion. Today, Matthew's love of the human story keeps him writing both professionally and for pleasure.

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Micia Mosely, Ph.D.
Itoro Udofia, Program Manager

Itoro Udofia is a cultural worker and educator with over ten years in education, program development, and youth advocacy. She brings in-the-field experience, as well as experience working in the classroom and with community organizations to develop the leadership capacities of everyday people. Udofia comes from a family of educators and teachers dedicated to education and cultivating an equitable world. Her commitment has been to uplift and nurture communities within the African Diaspora to operate at their fullest potential. She is excited to be a part of such innovative work, and a wonderful team.

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Micia Mosely, Ph.D.
Kara Wuest, Operations and Communications Coordinator

Kara Wuest has worked as a bagel baker, dishwasher, bike mechanic, bookseller, production coordinator & managing editor. As operations and communications coordinator for the Black Teacher Project, Kara is galvanized by contributing support to the movement. Kara is a white former southerner who imagines a world with more dignity. You can read Kara's #myblackteacher story here.

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The Black Teacher Project works with university partners to understand the current experiences of Black teachers in New York and the Bay Area. Specifically, we look at the challenges faced by Black inservice and pre-service teachers (e.g. lack of support; financial challenges; assumptions about interests/skills; push to leadership) and develop innovative programming to address those challenges. Our continuous improvement approach also allows us to pilot our strategies, collect data and adapt accordingly.

The Black Teacher Project recruits, develops and sustains Black teachers for schools in the United States. Our goal is to create an effective teaching force that reflects the diversity of Black people in this country. Our premise is that Black educators offer indispensable insights into the lived realities of navigating schooling institutions, as well as into the social structures of the United States. Therefore, every young person, regardless of racial or ethnic identity, can benefit from the influence of highly effective Black teachers in their life. Our vision is that all children will have access to a well-trained, well-supported, Black teaching force.

To achieve this vision, the BTP (1) develops specific recruitment strategies for future Black teachers, (2) develops data driven supports for Black teachers to sustain themselves personally and professionally, and (3) conducts research on Black teacher health and sustainability.

Founded in 2015, The Black Teacher Project has gathered teachers in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area to discuss the experiences and needs of Black teachers. The BTP has partnered with Teaching Residents at Teachers College, Columbia University to recruit Black teachers into their innovative program building a strong teaching force for New York City. The project has also partnered with Institute for Urban Minority Education at Teachers College, Columbia University as well as University of California San Diego to conduct research about the current conditions, health and wellness of Black teachers. The Black Teacher Project is also supporting San Francisco Unified School District and the city of Oakland in retaining their Black teacher force.