"Every child deserves a Black teacher"

Celebrate Black Teacher Learning with BTP

If you’ve been to any programming with the Black Teacher Project, you know that we like to take a moment to reflect together. We do the same process internally, and one of the results from our first full year of programming is our annual report for 2016 to 2017. Today, we are thrilled to share the report with you as well as announce our invitation to SXSWEdu in March 2018! BTP will be presenting “Black Teachers Supporting One Another” in Austin and we hope to connect with Black teachers from across the country there. Thank you to everyone who voted for us! BTP’s annual report includes the voices of Black teachers, their experiences in our programs and in their classrooms, and the lessons that we have learned over the course of the school year. The feedback that our participants have given creates new questions around the dynamics of recru...

Welcome, Fellows!

The upcoming 2017 - 2018 school year will be the kick-off for the first group of Black Teacher Project fellows. We selected a dynamic group of mid-career teachers working in the Bay Area who have committed to this three year program. Together, this learning community will engage in ongoing classroom-based inquiry with structured support to build their leadership capacity and improve their student outcomes.

Kampala Taiz-Rancifer

I feel education is one of the most important civil rights issue affecting us today.  Closing the opportunity gap is what drew me to teaching. I want to help students build a strong foundation so they can achieve their maximum potential. Kampala Taiz-Rancifer participated in the Black Leadership and Sustainability Institute in Oakland and will be continuing to b...

Creating Healing Space for Black Female Educators

Second Annual Women's History Month BAY AREA CONVERSATION WITH BLACK TEACHER PROJECT Thursday, March 30, 2017 | 5:30pm to 7:30pm Reposted with great appreciation from www.blackfemaleproject.org. Our second annual Conversation with Black Teacher Project was a success, as community members and educators came together for a timely Women's History Month conversation. Guests came to observe Black female teachers in discussion about how they navigate structural racism and sexism in the workplace and beyond. [gallery size="medium" columns="2" ids="870,871,872,873,874,875"] Attendees and conversation participants were moved, gained clarity and left inspired and affirmed—a result of the love of sisterhood and community. Think we're biased? Read what attendees had to say below. What I enjoyed most about the event was: “The feeling of sisterhood and connection” “The voices, the synergy and intergenerational wisdom.“ "We are all powerful as a unified force of positive movement for students." "Fellowship and storytelling with African Teacher...

BTP likes beats! Want to win a pair of Beats headphones? Fill out our end of the year survey!

    Thank you for all your work inside and outside the classroom in the past school year! We have appreciated all your participation in Black Teacher Project events and programming. You made the 2016 - 2017 school year a success for us and your colleagues. The Black Teacher Project is asking for one more thing—we need your participation in our end-of-year survey. Demographic and descriptive data are crucial for funding and research. If you are a Black teacher who has participated in 2 or more BTP events, we are hoping that you can help us by filling out this survey. It's also an opportunity to give BTP feedback about your experiences and your needs as a Black teacher. If you complete the survey by July 17, we will enter your name in a drawing to win a pair ...

Why Black Teachers Matter

By Micia Mosely, PhD and Matthew Florence An article recently posted on New York School Talk, “A Parent’s Perspective on the Benefits of Teachers of Color,” posed the challenging question of how to make our schools more effective at educating our young people. After dismissing several solutions like Finnish-style education and Computer Science as magic bullets, the article turned to efforts at diversifying the teacher population. The question essentially turned to whether should school districts be hiring more Black teachers for the sake of diversity or hiring more capable teachers. As part of an organization that advocates for Black teachers, the framing of this question got our dander up. More than anything, as we continued to read the article, we came to the same conclusion we've held sinc...

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